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A Few Facts that Should Be Realised

Mentally Ill is not Eccentric
Some Bad Moods are OK
Drugs are not the most Effective Way to Treat Depressions
Clinical Depressions are neither Desirable nor Inevitable and Can be Overcome

Mentally Ill is not Eccentric

When people say that someone is “crazy”, “insane”, “out of his mind” etc. they usually mean that he or she is eccentric or behaving irrationally, not that they are mentally unsound. I know and have heard about many people who are eccentric or very eccentric and yet are perfectly sane, and lead perfectly happy lives.

There’s a difference between conformism or “being normal” and mental health.

Some Bad Moods are OK

Some bad moods are normal and are a healthy part of living and would not lead to depression. For example, if someone you cared about died, it’s perfectly OK to feel sad. Rational fear is also normal and healthy. My point is that one cannot or should not be fully happy all the time. Sometimes it is also OK to be a little “down”.

Drugs are not the most Effective Way to Treat Depressions

Depressions have a cause. According to Feeling Good, it is usually a thought or a group of thoughts that is bothering someone, and caused someone to feel depressed. These thoughts are normally triggered by something difficult or intimidating, but it is not necessary that something like that will make one depressed - one can often cope with it without being depressed.

In any case, Psychoactive medication attempts to deal with the symptom that is a chemical problem in the functioning of the brain. However, it does not deal with the actual cause that is the mental problem.

In order to deal with the cause instead of the symptom, you still need Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and to read Feeling Good.

That put aside I should note that I am taking medication, prescribed to me by a Psychiatrist. It does not prevent me from becoming hypomanic, but it may make the hypomanias less severe (I’m not entirely sure about that).

Clinical Depressions are neither Desirable nor Inevitable and Can be Overcome

Some unipolar individuals I talked with, who seemed to have been somewhat relativists argued that being clinically depressed or hypomanic, was perfectly OK and that it was just a natural state, and that it was just “society” or the “environment” that didn’t like it. All of this is non-sense, because I clearly recall feeling miserable when being depressed or clinically anxious and after gaining some awareness, was able to tell that my hypomanias were not desirable either. It’s not a belief that people have conditioned me to believe - it’s one that I developed myself.

I can rant much more about Post-modernist relativism, that some of proponents of it claimed people with disabilities such as deafness or blindness, who can be treated to some extent, should not be, because deafness or blindness were just different ways of perception, and not actual disabilities. But the point is that while you may experience depression or hypomania, it is neither desirable nor inevitable, and that you can overcome it.

During my normal state, I had, like other people, experienced many positive and negative emotions: joy, anger, frustration, fear, boredom, a feeling of disorientation, love, exhilaration, attraction, disappointment, hatred, remorse, sadness, etc. This is perfectly normal and these emotions have a purpose, and I was otherwise happy when I experienced them. But they are more natural than depression, which is much longer, and is mentally and physically unhealthy. [Emotions]

That put aside, you shouldn’t feel bad about being depressed when you do. It’s perfectly OK to feel it, and being consumed with guilt about being depressed will only make it worse. You should accept the fact that you’re feeling bad or being under-productive and realise that this feeling will pass.



[Emotions] One should note that emotions and feelings should not be our master. Often they can be misleading and irrational. For example, if my friend failed a test that I did well on, I may feel smugness or superiority, but this feeling is probably not rational or will make me happy in the long run.

Feelings should not be repressed, in the sense that we deny that we feel this way. But we sometimes can acknowledge that we feel like it, and behave in a different way. A person is allowed to feel anything including a desire for mayhem and murder. Only behaving based on these emotions in either words or deeds may be bad.

While we can enjoy a rational happy emotion, and try to behave on a rational bad emotion, we sometimes need to take actions that will make us feel bad. For example, validly criticising a friend in private, or admitting you’ve done something wrong.